nursery bookshelves Organization

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

We made a set of nursery bookshelves to store, organize and display baby books.

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

Well, it looks like we are actually going to finish this nursery before baby makes his arrival! It didn’t seem like we were going to make it but he decided to stay put for a little longer and is now four days past his due date which has given us plenty of time to finish all of our last minute projects including the nursery wall storage, baby clothing rack and now our nursery bookshelves. (Plus, we have one more project on the way to share that is AWESOME.)

If you couldn’t already tell by the massive shelves we built in our library, we like to read, a lot. Both Brent and I are looking forward to reading to our son right away, even if he doesn’t understand what we are reading just yet. It was a given we would incorporate bookshelves into the nursery.

The nursery has two small walls that are at an angle so we thought that making bookshelves that ran vertically up the wall would be a good use of space.

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

A popular trend right now is using the IKEA spice racks for baby books so we took that idea and built our own larger, beefier version so we could fit more books on them and fill up the wall.

To see how we built our nursery bookshelves, check out the video or follow along with the steps below.

How We Made Our Nursery Bookshelves

SUPPLIES

  • (1) 1″x6″x48″ select pine (makes 1 shelf)
  • Wood glue
  • 1 5/8″ wood screws
  • 1 1/2″ finishing nails
  • Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® Waterbased Paint in Bright White
  • Nap roller
  • Painters tape
  • 3″ screws
  • Miter saw
  • Clamps
  • Drill
  • Nail gun
  • Level

FYI: This post contains a few affiliate links to products we used to make this project. Gray House Studio does receive commissions for sales from these links but at no extra cost to you. We appreciate you supporting this site. Read our privacy and disclosure policy. You can also easily shop our recommended products here.

DIRECTIONS WATCH

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DIRECTIONS READ

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

CUT THE PIECES FOR THE SHELVES

1. To begin making the nursery bookshelves, first we made all of our cuts using the miter saw. We made the following cuts:

The bottom piece of the shelf: 1”x6” cut 20” long
The two side pieces of the shelf: 1”x6” cut 4” long
The mounting plate on the back of the shelf: 1”x2” cut 10” long
The front rail of the shelf: 1”x1” cut 20” long

Because we were making four shelves we cut multiple of the same pieces at one time to make sure they were all the exact same length. We clamped a board to the fence of the saw to help make the cuts the same.

ASSEMBLE THE SHELVES

Nursery Bookshelves DIY
Nursery Bookshelves DIY

2. To assemble the nursery bookshelves, first we used our drill to drill two pilot holes into the back of the bottom piece of the shelf and attached the mounting plate piece with wood glue and 1 ⅝” wood screws to the bottom piece of the shelf.

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

3. Next, we attached each of the side pieces to the bottom piece with wood glue and 1 ½” finishing nails.

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

4. Finally, we attached the front rail to the side pieces with wood glue and 1 ½” finishing nails. We used a scrap 1”x2” to rest the rail on while we nailed it from the side boards with our nail gun.

PAINT THE SHELVES

Nursery Bookshelves DIY
Nursery Bookshelves DIY

5. Once all of our nursery bookshelves were assembled, we used wood filler to fill the holes and then painted the shelves with Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® Waterbased Paint in Bright White and a nap roller for a smooth finish.

HANG THE SHELVES

Nursery Bookshelves DIY
Nursery Bookshelves DIY

6. Before hanging the shelves, we marked the wall studs with painters tape. Then we centered each shelf on the wall and made sure it was level. Finally, we screwed the shelves into the wall over the studs with 3” screws.

Nursery Bookshelves DIY

The nursery bookshelves were super simple to build and turned out great. We love filling the nursery bookshelves up with books. We have been receiving books as gifts and it is so fun to add them to the shelves as we start a collection for our baby boy.

STAY TUNED: We have one more large DIY project in the nursery to share that is pretty unique and fun as well as a tutorial on how we converted a regular chair into a rocking chair, AND the full tour of our outdoor modern nursery is coming up in the next few weeks. There are still more nursery posts on the way!

Baby Clothes Rack Nursery Storage Organization

Baby Clothes Rack

We built a vertical baby clothes rack to store clothes in our nursery to make up for the lack of closet.

Baby Clothes Rack

You know the proverb, “necessity is the mother of invention”? Well, Brent and I found ourselves needing to apply this saying to our baby clothes storage situation in the nursery.

The problem: The nursery does not have a closet therefore there was no designated space to store and organize baby clothes.

And since it is necessary for a babies to wear their cute little clothes (at least some of the time) we had to come up with a solution for clothes storage in our nursery.

I can’t tell you how long I would sit in the nursery and just stare at the area we designated for clothes storage and try and brainstorm ideas for how to store the clothes. I was stumped and frustrated because I knew I wanted something specific I just didn’t know what yet.

We could have used a dresser but with the crib, changing table and a huge teepee shelf we are building, I didn’t want another large piece of furniture taking away from those pieces. I spent hours searching for ideas everywhere but everything I could find would take up too much floor real estate.

I had two criteria in mind: I didn’t want it to take up a lot of space and I wanted it to look like a display you would see in a store since the clothes were going to be out in the open and not behind closet doors.

Baby Clothes Rack

And then I came across an image of dowel rods holding a sack of potatoes and a light bulb went off. Seriously, inspiration can come from the strangest of places. Since starting Gray House Studio I have come a long way in my ability to visualize designs and concepts and the fact that I could see a baby clothes rack from this idea makes me pretty proud. Ha.

I explained to Brent my vision and he executed my idea perfectly and even threw in a few other great suggestions because he is awesome like that and thus our vertical baby clothes rack was made!

Baby Clothes Rack

On the top dowel rods we are hanging shirts, pants and some of my favorite onesies. I ordered wood hangers to make it look more like a display. Plus, is there anything cuter than baby wood hangers? They are so tiny!

Baby Clothes Rack

We purchased these metal wire baskets from Target. We actually bought them first so we could build the width of the baby clothes rack frame around them so they would fit perfectly. They had gold handles which were not the style we were going for and would not hang on the dowel rods anyway so Brent removed them.

Baby Clothes Rack

Brent had the great idea to create leather straps to hang the baskets on the dowel rods. This worked really well and tied the look to the nursery wall storage bar on the opposite wall.

Baby Clothes Rack

We added a shelf at the top to add a few decor items. I stole the fox artwork from the gym shelves but it fits with this room better anyway because we are incorporating little foxes here and there throughout the room.

To see how we built our baby clothes rack, check out the video or follow along with the steps below.

How We Made Our Baby Clothes Rack

SUPPLIES

  • (2) pine 2×2″s
  • (2) Round poplar dowels (48-in L x 1-in dia)
  • Titebond-3 Ultimate Wood Glue
  • 1 ½” finishing nails
  • 3” decking screws
  • Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® Waterbased Paint in Dovetail
  • Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® Waterbased Paint in Bright White
  • Heavy leather scraps
  • Embroidery floss
  • Miter saw
  • Framing square
  • Drill press + 1” forstner bit
  • Nail gun
  • Nap roller + small paintbrush
  • Rubber mallet
  • Drill
  • Level

FYI: This post contains a few affiliate links to products we used to make this project. Gray House Studio does receive commissions for sales from these links but at no extra cost to you. We appreciate you supporting this site. Read our privacy and disclosure policy. You can also easily shop our recommended products here.

DIRECTIONS WATCH

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DIRECTIONS READ

Baby Clothes Rack

1 To start the baby clothes rack, we cut two pine 2×2”s into four pieces. Two long pieces for the sides of the rack and two short pieces for the top and bottom of the rack.

Baby Clothes Rack

2 On the two side pieces we used a framing square to make marks six inches apart where we needed to make the holes for our dowel rods.

We used a drill press with a 1” forstner bit to drill the holes in the side pieces but stopped each hole ¼” shy of going all the way through the board.

Baby Clothes Rack

3 Next, we attached the four pieces of the frame together using wood glue and 1 ½” finishing nails.

Baby Clothes Rack

4 To provide extra strength and support, we came back and drilled pilot holes and secured the pieces of the frame together using 3” decking screws.

Baby Clothes Rack

5 Once the frame was assembled we took our two dowel rods and cut them down to 12” pieces using the miter saw.

Baby Clothes Rack

6 We used a nap roller to paint the frame of the baby clothes rack with Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® waterbased paint in Dovetail, the same color as the wall in the nursery. We used a smaller paintbrush to paint in the holes of the frame.

Baby Clothes Rack

7 Then we painted all the dowel rods with Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® waterbased paint in Bright White with a smaller paintbrush.

Baby Clothes Rack

8 We inserted the dowel rods into the holes of the clothes rack frame with a few taps of a rubber mallet.

Baby Clothes Rack

9 We installed the frame in the nursery by screwing the rack into the wall studs and used a level to make sure it was straight on the wall.

Baby Clothes Rack

10 Finally, we removed the handles that came on the baskets and used embroidery floss to sew 1” wide leather loops onto the metal baskets so they would hang from the dowel rods.

Baby Clothes Rack

The baskets work so well. They are the perfect depth for storing lots of onesies, hats, socks, etc. and are really easy to grab but still look nice and organized.

Baby Clothes Rack

Baby Clothes Rack

We will probably store shoes on the bottom shelf once he has shoes but for now it is holding extra blankets.

I love all of the nursery projects we have made so far but the baby clothes rack is definitely one of my favorites because I think it is unique and Brent really made my idea come to life.

By being vertical and hanging on the wall it takes up no floor space but has plenty of storage space to keep baby clothes organized.

Plus, it looks nice enough to be out in the open displaying clothes.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves Projects

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves DIY

We built wall-mounted plant shelves to hold faux plants to create an accent wall in our home office.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves

Brent and I like creating accent walls. So far we have created a wood plank wall in our reading nook and a faux brick wall in our home gym. When it came to the large wall in our home office above our new cabinets we knew we wanted to incorporate plants as part of the focal wall but we spent a lot of time racking on our brains on the best way to display them in this space.

I was really drawn to the idea of having identical plants in identical pots in neat and organized rows. While I would have LOVED to incorporate live plants, let’s just be real they would have all died slow painful deaths at different rates and it would have totally ruined the uniform look we are going for. Luckily, IKEA has some pretty realistic and inexpensive plants that really made our vision come to life.

To display the plants, we built five super simple wall-mounted plant shelves and today we are going to show you how!

VIDEO TUTORIAL

In this video we will show the steps, materials and tools needed to make wall-mounted plant shelves for an accent wall featuring plants.

To see new DIY videos on Thursdays, be sure to subscribe to our channel ⇾


SUPPLIES

MATERIALS

  • (1) Whiteboard 1-IN x 6-IN x 6FT
  • (2) Whiteboard 1-IN x 6-IN x 8FT
  • (15) MANDEL Plant Pots (from IKEA)
  • (15) Artificial Potted Plants
  • Sherwin-Williams ProClassic® Waterbased Paint in Dovetail SW 7018
TOOLS

  • Drill
  • Miter Saw
  • Nail Gun + 1 1/2″ Finishing Nails
  • Wood Glue
  • Clamps
  • Ruler, Pencil, Framing Square

*This post contains an affiliate link. You can read our disclosure policy here.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves

How to Build Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
1. First, Brent measured the 1×6 inch board and using the miter saw cut the piece for the back of the shelves 36 inches long.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
2. Next, on the miter saw he cut three smaller boards 5 1/2 inches long each. These pieces would become the shelves so they needed to be long enough and wide enough for the pots we had to sit on.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
3. Before attaching the three smaller boards to the long board, Brent measured and made straight marks 13 inches apart from the bottom with a framing square. The bottom of each smaller board lined up with these lines he marked.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
4. Brent applied wood glue to one side of one of the smaller boards and clamped it to the bottom of the long board.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
5. Then he secured the smaller board to the larger board with a nail gun and 1 ½ inch finishing nails.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
6. He repeated the previous two steps to attach the additional two smaller boards to the large board where he made the marks 13 inches apart. In total we built five shelves.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
7. Once the glue dried, we painted the shelves Dovetail Gray (from Sherwin-Williams) to match the cabinets and desk in the room. We painted them two shades darker than the walls so that they would subtly stand out from the wall without being too overpowering and taking away from the plants.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
8. Next, on the top of each shelf, Brent marked and drilled 3/8 inch holes in the center of each shelf, 6 inches down from the top.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
9. To attached the shelves to the wall, Brent started measuring from the center of the wall and screwed five drywall screws 16 inches apart the same distance from the ceiling.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
10. Finally, we hung the wall-mounted plant shelves on the wall.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves
11. Then we added our ceramic pots and faux plants.

Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves

I love how this wall turned out. The muted colors, the uniformity, and the greenery goes perfectly in our new home office and while it is definitely the focal wall, doesn’t overwhelm the space. Plus, it wasn’t as expensive as we anticipated considering how many plants we needed to buy.

Take a tour of our completed industrial home office!

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Wall-Mounted Plant Shelves DIY

DIY Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge Projects

Plywood Shelves for our Home Gym

Check out how we made a wall of quirky plywood shelves for our home gym.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge

Hello! It’s Courtney here today sharing our latest DIY project for our home gym. The past few weekends we tackled a pretty large project for the room, a huge wall of plywood shelves with an exposed edge. With every task we complete in our gym, we are getting more and more excited about how it is coming together and what the end result will look like.

We had high expectations that our home gym makeover would be completed by the first week of November. But as usual life got in the way. Don’t you hate when that happens? We didn’t quite hit our target completion date but we are still plugging away at it little by little.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge

We had initially intended to have a large piece of art on this wall but I am learning that it is always a good idea to be flexible when it comes to designing and decorating your home because you never know when a better idea could come along.

After giving it some more thought we changed our minds and decided it would be fun to make the shelves into a form of art by creating a design of different shapes. It is quirky but we love it!

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge

Can you believe we made all those shelves with just one piece of plywood? The entire process went smoothly too! As a bonus, the weather is starting to cool off here in Houston so we actually enjoyed working on this project in our shop/garage and didn’t melt in the process.

We filmed our whole plywood shelves making journey to share how these came together. Watch the video below to follow along.

VIDEO TUTORIAL

To see new DIY videos on Thursdays, be sure to subscribe to our channel ⇾


HOW We Made Our Plywood Shelves

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
1. We used blue painters tape to first create the shapes of the shelves on the wall. This helped us determine the exact measurements we needed to cut the wood.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
2. We bought a large piece of really nice plywood to use for our shelves. We had our local hardware store cut down the piece into smaller sizes so it would be easier to work with and fit in our car.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
3. Next, we had to cut down the large pieces of plywood into many, many, many smaller pieces using our table saw. Brent made a crosscut sled to make the process easier and to make sure each board was cut to the exact the same size.

I helped keep the boards steady. To save time and energy, we cut all the boards to be the same size which was the longest side on the shelves.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
4. We wanted the shelves to be nice and thick so for each piece of the plywood shelves we glued two of our boards together and then clamped them while they dried in place.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
5. After the boards were dry, we used a miter saw to cut the boards down to size at a 45 degree angle so the boards would go together like a picture frame.

We used a backing board to prevent tear out so all the boards would be nice and smooth.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
6. We applied glue to each corner of the smaller shelves and then put them together using scrap boards and a ratchet strap that held the pieces tightly in place as they dried.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
7. For the large shelf we used the miter saw to cut the piece into two L shapes.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
8. We glued the two L shape pieces to the two smaller shelves and then used large clamps to hold the piece in place while the glue dried. This completed the large shelf assembly.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
9. Back in the room we used a stud finder to located where each screw needed to go so it was in a stud. We marked these spots with painters tape. We also marked these same spots on the shelves.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
10. Before removing the tape on the wall, we used the marks we made with the tape to locate where to secure the screws in the wall and drilled holes in the shelves in the same location to match.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
11. We drilled pocket holes to anchor the shelves into the wall with the screw.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
12. Finally, we got all of our shelves up hanging on the wall.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
I went out one day shopping to try and find items to fill up our new shelves that would fit the right depth, had a vintage/industrial feel, were quirky, and not too expensive.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
I am a shopping novice so I was a little intimidated to get all the items in one trip but with my measurements, a tape measure and a photo, I managed to get the exact right amount of items to decorate the shelves.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
This bike was a really cool find. I was looking for a decor piece that was unique and looked old and somewhat fitness related to be the prominent feature on the shelves. I must have walked squeezed through the crowded aisles of HomeGoods (why is that place ALWAYS packed?) at least 20 times until finally I spotted this little guy all by itself stuck at the very back of a bottom shelf. I was so excited I might have cheered out loud. I felt like I won a treasure hunt.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
I did measure everything depth wise before I bought it to make sure it would fit on the plywood shelves but I didn’t realize the bike would fit perfectly on the one area of the shelf. It was like it was like the bike was made for the shelf or the shelf was made for the bike.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
I love playing volleyball so obviously I had to display my super awesome summer 2012 runner-up Parks & Recreation co-ed volleyball team plaque from back when I lived in Dallas. We did win a couple of seasons but somehow when we got runner-up it was my turn to take the plaque home.

Funny how that works…oh well. I have been waiting patiently to find a place to showcase this beauty. Haha.

Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge
We are extremely happy with how the shelves turned out. They are quirky and fun which makes us happy. If there was anywhere you could get away with eclectic shelving, I think a home gym is the place.

I would like to report that since the shelves went up in the home gym last weekend I have worked out in there 4 out of the 5 week days this week which is my new record since we bought the treadmill. Is there a correlation? Maybe, just maybe.

The room is shaping up to be a really enjoyable space to spend our time. We only have a few projects left in this room which include building a locker area, new lighting, building a stand for weights, and to do something cool with the window. We can’t wait to get this room finished!

In the meantime be sure to catch up on some of our other home gym projects:
painting a faux brick wall, yoga mat rack, gym details, vintage gymnasium clock, choosing gym floor mats

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Plywood Shelves with an Exposed Edge

DIY Industrial Shelves Plans Plans

DIY Industrial Shelves Plans

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves Plans

Okay, this post has been a long time coming, eight months to be exact (procrastination, party of 2 right over here) but we finally have our DIY industrial shelves plans ready for you today!

The shelves we built in our library have really had a spotlight on them this month and we are so appreciative of everyone who has taken the time to stop by our blog or social media accounts and leave kind words and ask questions about this project.

We have been getting several inquiries about more precise details on how we built the shelves (pipe pieces needed, sizes of pipes, distance of holes, etc.) and that was really the kick in the you know what we needed to put the finishing touches on our plans so we could make them available to share. We get kind of crazy excited to hear when others are interested in making their own versions of our projects.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves Plans

Brent put together this awesome set of plans as a PDF that you can download to walk you through building your own set of sturdy industrial shelves. So whether you are ready to start building today or want to save it as an idea for a future project, feel free to bookmark it, pin it, save it to your tablet or go old school and print it to have for future reference. As always, if you have any questions along the way feel free to email us or leave them in the comments section.

You can read more about our industrial shelves and see our finished project here.

Download our DIY Industrial Shelves Plans (PDF)

BHG Style Spotters

On a related note, I was a guest blogger over on Better Homes and Gardens Style Spotters blog last week where I shared a few more details about our industrial shelves project. It was a fun opportunity to be able to share why and how we came to the decision to build these massive shelves in what was the formal dining room. Stop by the BHG blog and check it out.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Projects

Floating Shelves in Guest Bathroom

We built a pair of floating shelves to store towels and display decor in our guest bathroom.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio

Brent and I both took off this past Friday and it made me wish every week could include a three day weekend. It is amazing how much more we are able to both accomplish and relax with an extra day off. We didn’t have anything planned so we worked on checking a few smaller home renovation projects off our list. We managed to get two projects completed, buy supplies for a third project that we will work on today and shopped for new plants for our front flower beds and it is only early Sunday afternoon.

It has been a busy weekend but we were also able to have plenty of down time for dinner and frozen yogurt by the lake with family and enjoying one too many Girl Scout cookies while we lounged on the couch and made our way through several episodes of Bloodline on Netflix. That is one perk of living in the suburbs, it is not difficult in the slightest to get your hands on a box (or two) of Caramel deLites. They basically just show up on your doorstep.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio

We are excited to have Brent’s parents come visit next weekend and want to get as much of the guest bathroom spruced up as we can before they arrive. Our first project this weekend was to build floating shelves next to the shower. We are really happy with how they turned out and how quickly they came together. Today we are sharing how we built our shelves in a few easy steps.

SUPPLIES

MATERIALS

  • (1) 2″ x 12″ Pine Board
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Stain in Kona
  • 3″ Deck Screws
TOOLS

  • Table Saw
  • Ruler
  • Drill
  • Clamps
  • Router

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio

How We Built our Floating Shelves

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
1. The first thing we did was to take our two pieces of pine (that we cut from the 2″ x 12″ to be the correct width for our space) and used a table saw cut off the back inch of the board. This created our bracket piece that we used to anchor the shelf into the wall. By cutting it off the back of the board it matched back up seamlessly with the front of the shelf.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
2. For the supports that connect to the bracket anchored into the wall, Brent cut 1″ x 1″ pieces from the left over piece of pine. These boards support the weight of the shelf.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
3. Then we laid out the three pieces of the bracket. This is how the completed bracket will look.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
4. We used self tapping screws to connect the three pieces of the bracket together. Brent always tries to avoid screwing through any knots because when screwing into knots, that have a tendency to split. We know this from experience.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
5. We dabbed some wood glue on the end of the two 1″ x 1″ boards that we then screwed into the back piece of the bracket to create strong joints so it would be nice and sturdy once it was assembled.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
6. Now that we had our bracket assembled, we needed to remove slots from the bottom of the shelf to created a recessed area where the bracket could fit into the shelf.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
7. To determine the area of the shelf that needed to be removed for the brackets, we simply traced the outline of the bracket on the bottom of the shelf.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
8. We then secured the board to our work space using clamps to make sure it would not move around once Brent started routing the slots. He set his router to be the correct depth and put on all his safety equipment to protect his face while working on this part.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
9. To route the slots, Brent used a half inch router bit. It took two passes to get enough of the material removed.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
10. To route in a straight line, Brent used a piece of scrap board clamped to the shelf to guide the router. Once the first pass with the router was cut, he moved the scrap board over to guide the router again for the second cut.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
11. After Brent finished routing the slots from the bottom of the shelf, he test fit the bracket. It fit perfectly. We always do a happy dance when everything works and fits together correctly the first time. It is a very satisfying feeling.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
12. We used the same stain on the shelves as we used on the mirrors we framed in the previous project. The great thing about building your own furniture is you can stain everything to match.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
13. After marking the studs with a stud finder, we secured the bracket to the wall with 3″ deck screws.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
14. The bracket isn’t much to look at by itself but it is secure and will support the shelf which is all that really matters.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
15. This is a view of what the bottom of the shelf looks like after it is attached to the bracket. We thought about trying to conceal the bracket but we like how it makes for a nice design element on the bottom of the shelf, if you happen to look under the bottom of the shelf.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
This is what the floating shelves looked like once they were both up on the wall.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
I styled the floating shelves with a few simple tropical elements to tie in with the shower curtain and some bathroom necessities so they are nice and handy for guests.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
I love how the framed print turned out on this shelf. We purchased the digital version of this leaf print and then Brent tapped into his past experience with printmaking to help take it up a level. He tore the edges of some nice paper he had left over from when he worked on letterpress prints and ran it through the ink jet printer.

Then he mounted that on another piece of his nice paper and we put a matte around it and framed it with this large white frame I had but could never find anything to put in it. The torn edges and three dimensional feel help give it more of a fine art print appearance and allowed us to scale it larger while still only using our home printer. Check out our tutorial on framing prints to see in more detail how we did this.

Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio
Here is the progress in this room. It is such a small and narrow room that it is very tricky to photograph the whole thing to show all the changes we have made so far. We will just share each section we work on until the entire room is complete.

Adding floating shelves, framing our mirrors and putting up a bronze shower curtain rod has already transformed this room into a much more welcoming space. Our next project is to build a new towel rack!

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Floating Shelves in Bathroom Gray House Studio

DIY Industrial Shelves Furniture

DIY Industrial Shelves

Check out how we made a large wall of DIY industrial shelves out of pipes and 2″ X 12″s for our home library.

DIY Industrial Shelves

We are excited to share our latest project, our DIY industrial shelves that we built for our library. We have been sharing a few sneak peeks here and there but today we are finally sharing the complete project!

Both Brent and I enjoy reading and liked the idea of having lots of shelves filled with books on display. We wanted lots of shelving but didn’t necessarily want to build a large conventional bookcase.

We decided on building the support system out of pipes. By going with this design we needed less tools and could piece it together over a few weekends but it still visually packs a big punch in the front of our house.

DIY Industrial Shelves
You may remember this room looking like this last time you saw it. At this point we had just moved the treadmill out and the keyboard and guitars into the room. This was a temporary move just so we had something in the room. We knew we had bigger and better things in store for this space, DIY industrial shelves!

DIY Industrial Shelves
First we painted the room. I am still amazed by the transformation power a little paint on the wall can do for a room. We used the same color as the living room and kitchen, Mindful Gray from Sherwin Williams, for the library. Now we had a big, gorgeous blank wall that was ready for some floor to ceiling shelves!

SUPPLIES

MATERIALS

  • (7) 2″ x 12″ x 10′ Pine Boards
  • (32) 3/4″ x 12″ Long Black Pipe
  • (28) 3/4″ x 6″ Short Pipe
  • (4) 3/4″ x 2″ Nipple
  • (4) 3/4″ x 3/4″ Coupling
  • (1) bag of low loft batting
  • (32) 3/4″ x 3/4″ Elbow
  • (28) 3/4″ x 3/4″ Tee
  • (8) 3/4″ Flange
  • Rust-Oleum Wood Stain, Kona
  • 2-1/4″ screws

*This post contains some affiliate links. You can read our disclosure policy here.

How we Built our DIY Industrial Shelves

DIY Industrial Shelves
The day we bought the wood for the shelves was a doozy. I think I “worked out” harder on that day than I have in a long time. Helping Brent get those giant boards down off the shelf at the hardware store, into the truck, off the truck, into the backyard, up onto the platform to stain and then back into the garage was quite the job for my tiny little arms.

Let’s just say I don’t have a powerlifting background like Brent but I was determined to lift and carry those boards myself and I did!

One criteria Brent had for the shelves was he wanted to use thick boards. He decided on using seven 2″ X 12″s in 10′ lengths. The reasoning behind this was we wanted the shelves to be sturdy and substantial in both functionality and appearance.

This is the centerpiece of the room so we really wanted to build something that would grab your attention as soon as you walk in our door and dinky little shelves just wouldn’t cut it.

DIY Industrial Shelves
The other element to the shelves were the pipes and fittings that would run through the boards. Finding the quantity of pipes we needed for seven shelves was an unexpected set back. Each store only carried a very small amount of each piece at one time. It took us a month just to collect all the pieces of black iron pipes and fittings.

I am pretty sure we wiped every hardware store in Houston out of their inventory. So if you were in Houston shopping for black pipes in January, we’re sorry.

The pipes were disgusting when we got them (see photo above). They are coated so they don’t rust but since we were using the pipes and fittings indoors we had to spend a lot of time cleaning them.

It was a tedious task that was my least favorite part of the entire project. It pretty much consisted of wiping down roughly 150+ pieces of pipe with a paper towel and a little bit of paint thinner.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
1. We stained each board using the same stain as our nook wood plank wall, Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain in Kona.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
2. After I stained the board, Brent measured and marked where he would need to drill the holes so the pipes would go through the board.

He drew up all the plans himself and I was pretty impressed because each calculation and measurement had to be precise to ensure that every board would be same distance from the wall and line up with each other so the pipes could run through all them. We will be sharing his plans for our DIY industrial shelves in the next week.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
3. Next he used a hole saw attached to his drill and drilled four holes into each board.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
4. Once Brent drilled the holes, there were some areas exposed that had not been stained so I filled in those spots with stain to achieve a seamless look.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
5. He used a Kreg Jig to drill four pocket holes that were measured to match the stud layout in that wall.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
6. We checked and double checked that each board was level.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
7. After each board was level we secured the board to the wall by screwing it into studs through the pocket holes. For the bottom half of the shelves this was done on the bottom of the board and for the top half of the boards this was done on the top of the boards so that the holes in the boards would not be visible.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
8. We built the shelves board by board adding the next row of pipes as we went up the wall. This was our progress about half way. The photos below show closer up how the boards and pipes fit together.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves
9. After our DIY industrial shelves were installed, it was time to arrange all of our books and vintage pieces. It took me awhile to style the shelves and to be honest I will probably restyle them several more times.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves

Our book collections combined were not enough to fill up all the shelves so we added some really cool antique items that Brent has collected over the years like this cool radio and typewriter. I love old family photographs so I also wanted to display some of our grandparents in their younger years as well. Brent also built a stands to showcase a few records from his collection.

Gray House Studio DIY Industrial Shelves

We are so happy with how our DIY industrial shelves turned out. They really add the wow factor when you walk in our door that we were looking for. Of course one project leads to another and now I am daydreaming about replacing that carpet with wood floors because that would really make the room cozy and make the industrial look of the shelves make more sense. But it’s a slow process and every little step we take is moving this house in the right direction towards our home and I can be content with that.

{Oh, and did you notice that we got a new love seat too? Target was having a Valentine’s Day sale on their love seats and we jumped on the chance to get some seating in the room sooner than we expected. We like it so much that we will most likely get a matching one or two matching chairs to go with it.}

Download our free DIY industrial shelves plans to build your own and check out how our shelves were featured in the October 2015 issue of Better Homes and Gardens.

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DIY Industrial Shelves

Adding Shelves to Bathroom Cabinet Organization

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets

Check how we spent our weekend adding shelves in bathroom cabinets to create an organized storage space.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets

This morning Brent and I worked on a quick little organization project that really made me happy! Our project was adding shelves in the bathroom cabinets.

I don’t have a ton of beauty products but I do have the typical necessities and not a lot of places to store them. Don’t most bathroom cabinets seem to have so much wasted space at the top?

All of my stuff was just stacked on top of each other in one big pile on the bottom and if stuff got pushed to the back of the cabinet…well…it might as well have been lost forever as far as I was concerned.

I’ve tried to organize this area multiple times but I have found that without the proper set up, such as a designated space for each item, it doesn’t matter how many times you organize it, it quickly turns into a big messy pile again.

I am kind of embarrassed to be sharing this photo but for the sake of showing the drastic difference I feel like the shelves made, I’ll do it. Below is the disorganized mess it looked like before.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets

Brent built me two shelves in my cabinet using stuff we already had in our garage. Score! He built me one on the bottom and one at the top.

We decided to take the faux drawer above the cabinet door and add hinges to it so it could open up to a shelf we would install behind it where I could store my hair dryer and curling iron.

We have seen a few photos of this floating around on the internet but wanted to attempt to figure out our own Gray House style of making it happen.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
1. First we popped off the faux drawer. It came off really easy.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
2. Then using pliers we removed the brackets and staples from the drawer face and the cabinet.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
3. The hinges we used came with instructions saying that the center of the hole should be 2 centimeters from the edge of the board and the diameter of the hole should be 35 millimeters. So Brent measured where he needed to drill and then used the appropriate size forstner bit to drill the hole for the hinge.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
4. Brent marked a hole for the plastic screw anchor.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
5. Then he used a piece of tape to mark the depth of the cut so he would know when to stop drilling. This would prevent the drill bit from going all the way through the drawer face.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
6. With a soft faced mallet, Brent hammered in the plastic screw anchors and then attached the hinge to the drawer face with the screws.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
7. After centering the drawer face on the cabinet, he attached the other side of the hinge to the cabinet frame. We now have a functioning door.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
8. Then Brent started building the shallow shelf that would sit behind the hinged door. He used a piece of scrap wood that came from a shelf we tore down in our garage.

Bonus: it was already painted white! That was a huge time saver. He measured the width the shelf needed to be to fit in the cabinet in front of the sink.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
9. Next, he cut the shelf to size using a miter saw.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
10. He flipped the shelf over and clamped a Pocket-Hole Kreg Jig to the board and then used it to drill a pocket-hole on the bottom of the board.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
A close up of what the pocket-hole looks like.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
11. Finally, he installed the top shelf behind the hinged door. He used the same steps above for the bottom shelf as well.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
I am now storing my hair dryer and curling iron behind this secret little door. I like having these items up higher and within reach so they don’t fall towards the back of the cabinet.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
After Brent installed the bottom shelf, I finally got to organize this area like I have always wanted!

As you may be able to see, I found another use for my chalkboard tape. Ha. I found these little glass containers left over from our wedding and added some chalkboard tape labels to them and am now using them to store all my hair ties and bobby pins that were laying all over the place.

Hopefully by adding shelves in bathroom cabinets and having a place to store these things will keep them from getting lost and me having to buy new ones all the time.

Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets
It was a small project with a transformation that has a huge impact on that space. I am so happy with the results of adding shelves in bathroom cabinets and grateful Brent took the time to work on this with me. I love that each item has a designated spot to be put back and that all the space in the cabinet is now being utilized to it’s max capacity.

If you have any questions about adding shelves in bathroom cabinets, feel free to leave them in the comment section below.

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Adding Shelves in Bathroom Cabinets